Website Designers and Webmasters

Dedicated to all the tasks Webmasters, Website Developers and Website Designers find themselves facing.

By: Ashton Sanders

Network Solutions Rant v2.3

Sep 5 2007

Network Solutions continues to amaze me. I have a client who bought some very good domain names early in the domain rush, and she purchased them at Network Solutions for $35/year (as opposed to $9/year at godaddy.com or $6/year at 1and1.com).

Can Network Solutions Get Worse?

I wanted to forward one of her domains to 301 redirect to another domain, and after a couple clicks I found that it costs $20/year to forward a domain… and if you didn’t know… that is normally provided for free.

But Network Solutions Can’t get worse than that… Can they?

Yes they can. If you buy a domain at Godaddy, you get 100 email accounts free (or something ridiculous like that). If you want to get email with your Network Solutions domain, it costs $1.34/month for each email account… If you actually ended up using 100 email accounts with Network Solutions, they would charge you $134/month! That’s $1608/year for what you normally get for free at any other registrar…

-If you use network solutions, you obviously haven’t opened your eyes.
-Ashton Sanders

(P.S. If you are someone who actually likes Network Solutions, please shoot me a message with why that is. If you don’t exist, I wouldn’t be surprised.)

By: Ashton Sanders

Funny Email Conversation

Sep 4 2007

Filed under: Life,Rant,Webmaster

Today, I had a very funny email conversation that I felt obliged to share with you. The conversation was with a man named Steve who was transferring four domains to me.

If you are not familiar with the process of transferring domains, I will elaborate. It really is a very simple process:

1. You ask your current registrar to unlock the domain, and to send you the authorization codes.
2. When you go to your new registrar and try to transfer the domain, it asks for your authorization codes. You type in the Authorization code, and the transfer begins.
3. Most Domain registrars require one final step, and that is a confirmation email. Your new registrar sends the admin contact for the domain an email saying: “Are you sure you want to transfer this domain?”

So to put it simply:

1. Get Authorization Code
2. Use Authorization Code and begin transfer.
3. Answer Confirmation Email saying that you would like to transfer your domain.

I’ve already transferred a number of domains from Steve last month, and about a week ago, he emailed me saying that I still had 8 domains to transfer.

I emailed him and asked for the authentication codes, and he sent them. Then I started the domain transfer, and my registrar emailed him the confirmation emails.

I emailed him after a couple of days and said:

Thank you for these authentication codes. I requested the transfer for these four. Did you receive the Four Confirmation email yet?

Apparently that was too complicated and he responded with:

I sent you what I got. Which 4 are you talking about?

… Was my email that complicated? Maybe it was, so I tried to make it as simple as possible:

Hi Steve,

Yes, you sent me the four authentication codes. Thank you for that.

I requested the four domains to be transferred. When I do that, it sends an email to the admin contact (you) to confirm the transfer. The email should be titled: “Transfer of *DOMAIN*.com” or whatever the name of the domain is. Have you received any emails that start with ‘Transfer’ in the last 2 weeks or so?

Thanks for your help,
Ashton Sanders

This is what I got back:

Okay, here you go… I hope these are the ones. I already sent them Friday at 8/31/2007 1:02 PM. Did you not get that email?

Steve
Attached: Four Domain Authentication Codes

Wow! It would make it much easier if you would read my emails. When I write something in an email, I write it so you can read it and have a better understanding of what I need. To make it as simple as possible, I contacted my domain registrar and had them send the confirmation email again. I withheld my aggravation as best I could, and emailed him back saying:

Hi Steve,

I just had my domain registrar send the confirmation email again.

The only domain we actually need is:
*DOMAIN*.org

You should be getting that email soon,
Thanks,
Ashton Sanders

I guess that was too complicated… as he never responded.

-HaHaHaHa!
-Ashton Sanders

By: Ashton Sanders

The Problem with Web Developers

Aug 13 2007

Filed under: Rant,Webmaster

This post has been dwelling within me for the past couple days.

I’ve been trying to find a responsible ASP.net programmer for a three-week project. Unfortunately we have a problem with one of those words: responsible. How do I know they are responsible? How do I know they won’t put me off for another project, even though I’m paying them top dollar to do this project right now?

Ask for references… Great, this guy made 50 websites in the last 10 years, and three of them are happy. I guess that means he’s responsible.

It’s a very tough situation, especially since it is very hard to switch horses mid-stream when you get into the complicated and extensive programming projects.

I think I’ve heard so many bad guys say this in movies… and I’ll go ahead and repeat it.

-“If you want it done right, you got to do it yourself.”
-Ashton Sanders

By: Ashton Sanders

AOL – Service Review

Aug 11 2007

Filed under: Rant,Review

You can really summarize companies in two general categories:

Customer Orientedand

Profit Oriented

(Obviously this is a sliding scale but for the majority, companies will prefer one or the other.)

I have observed companies like Logitech and In-And-Out to be very Customer Oriented. When they (or even I) messed something up, they would go out of their way to fix it for me. And because of this customer orientation, I speak highly of them, and spend more money with them.

AOL is on the other end of the spectrum: Profit Oriented. They go out of their way to stop you from canceling their services etc. Their first programs were basically impossible to uninstall from your computer unless you were a computer genius… and even then it could take weeks to really get it off of your computer.

My first email address was with AOL, and when we realized that we could get better internet connection for cheaper elsewhere, we tried to uninstall it from our computer… for two years. Granted we didn’t know a lot about our computer, but we did know that once something is uninstalled, it shouldn’t keep making shortcuts on your desktop…

“But that was years ago, they are better now…”

If you believe that, I recommend checking out some of these people who tried to cancel their AOL account within the last few years:

Ask Dave Taylor how he canceled his AOL account.
Vincent Ferrari tries to cancel his AOL account.

AOL’s business decisions have lead to shirts that say “Friends don’t let friends use AOL” and hopefully will end up destroying them.

-Customer Service is King
-Ashton Sanders

By: Ashton Sanders

Network Solutions Does It Again…

Jul 3 2007

WiaF MascotYou may have read my previous rants on Network Solutions. If you haven’t, I’ll give you a quick run-down.

Network solutions, charges you a lot of money for normally inexpensive services. I’m not talking just a couple more buck; I’m talking six times what I’m paying. I pay $6/year for domain, Network Solutions charges $35/year.

If that doesn’t make you hate them, this might:

I got a client who had a domain registered there, and it was about to expire. Instead of paying $35/year, I recommended transferring their domain to a good domain registrar and pay $6-9/year. So I called in to transfer it.

I started the first transfer, and the email was sent to the wrong email address. (My fault.)

So I fixed the WhoIs information, and started the domain transfer request again. Nothing happened… (Network Solutions’ fault)

I called in again. Unfortunately, the domain had expired by this time, and they said I’d have to register for a year to unlock the domain. Well I didn’t want to pay $35 because they didn’t send an email that they should have. Finally after calling three or four times, I got someone who knew what they were doing and unlocked my domain.

I got the approval email, and I approved the transfer. Yeay! Now I only need to wait 7 days to get it to domain transfered. I was about to leave for a couple weeks, but that shouldn’t matter. The transfer has already begun, and the domain will be transfered.

Oh wait… my mistake… I forgot how BAD Network Solutions was.

I get back from my trip to find the domain hasn’t transfered yet… I call them up to find:

“I’m sorry, but this domain has been transfered to one of our partner companies, and I don’t have access to it.”

“So basically instead of transferring my domain to a different host, you transfered it to a domain scalper that’s going to charge me $1000 to get my domain back…”

Thank You Network Solutions! Keep up your horrible customer service, and America will catch on (slowly, but they will).

-Ashton Sanders

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You have found the semi-coherent ramblings of Ashton Sanders: a website designer, developer and webmaster. This is primarily Ashton's place to save notes about techniques and things that he learns in his never-ending conquest of the internet. Hopefully it's coherent enough to be useful to you too.

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